IEEE President’s Note: Looking to 2050 and Beyond

What will the future of the world look like? Everything in the world evolves. Therefore, IEEE also must evolve, not only to survive but to thrive. How will people build communities and engage with one another and with IEEE in the future? How will knowledge be acquired? How will content be curated, shared, and accessed? … Read more

Paying Tribute to 1997 IEEE President Charles K. Alexander

Charles K. Alexander, 1997 IEEE president, died on 17 October at the age of 79. The active volunteer held many high-level positions throughout the organization, including 1991–1992 IEEE Region 2 director. He was also the 1993 vice president of the IEEE United States Activities Board (now IEEE-USA). The IEEE Life Fellow worked in academia his … Read more

The James Webb Space Telescope was a Career-Defining Project for Janet Barth

Janet Barth spent most of her career at the Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Md.—which put her in the middle of some of NASA’s most exciting projects of the past 40 years. She joined the center as a co-op student and retired in 2014 as chief of its electrical engineering division. She had a … Read more

The Women Behind ENIAC – IEEE Spectrum

If you looked at the pictures of those working on the first programmable, general-purpose all-electronic computer, you would assume that J. Presper Eckert and John W. Mauchly were the only ones who had a hand in its development. Invented in 1945, the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) was built to improve the accuracy of … Read more

Why Your Organization Should Join the IEEE Standards Association

In our pilot study, we draped a thin, flexible electrode array over the surface of the volunteer’s brain. The electrodes recorded neural signals and sent them to a speech decoder, which translated the signals into the words the man intended to say. It was the first time a paralyzed person who couldn’t speak had used … Read more

IEEE’s Microwave Society Gets a New Name

In our pilot study, we draped a thin, flexible electrode array over the surface of the volunteer’s brain. The electrodes recorded neural signals and sent them to a speech decoder, which translated the signals into the words the man intended to say. It was the first time a paralyzed person who couldn’t speak had used … Read more

Attendance at IEEE’s STEM Summer Camp Breaks Records

In our pilot study, we draped a thin, flexible electrode array over the surface of the volunteer’s brain. The electrodes recorded neural signals and sent them to a speech decoder, which translated the signals into the words the man intended to say. It was the first time a paralyzed person who couldn’t speak had used … Read more

One Way to Stop the Social Spread of Disinformation

To stop the spread of disinformation on the Internet, do away with the current advertising-driven business model and instead let consumers sell their own data, IEEE Member Siavash Alamouti says. The crux of the problem, the wireless innovator says, is that model: Making money from ads and page views is encouraging people to share false … Read more

Nominate a Colleague for an IEEE Major Award

In our pilot study, we draped a thin, flexible electrode array over the surface of the volunteer’s brain. The electrodes recorded neural signals and sent them to a speech decoder, which translated the signals into the words the man intended to say. It was the first time a paralyzed person who couldn’t speak had used … Read more

Celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the Transistor With IEEE

In our pilot study, we draped a thin, flexible electrode array over the surface of the volunteer’s brain. The electrodes recorded neural signals and sent them to a speech decoder, which translated the signals into the words the man intended to say. It was the first time a paralyzed person who couldn’t speak had used … Read more